CFP: Special issue on “Teaching Digital” in Transformations: The Journal of Inclusive Scholarship and Pedagogy

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
TEACHING DIGITAL MEDIA
Guest Editor: Mary McAleer Balkun

The editors of Transformations seek articles (5,000 – 10,000 words) and media reviews (books, film, video, performance, art, music, etc. – 3,000 to 5,000 words) that explore the uses of digital media in all pedagogical contexts and disciplinary perspectives.

Submissions should explore the application or impact of any form of digital media on teaching and learning, including but not restricted to digital/digitized materials, specific software, social media, virtual environments, audio or visual media, and the internet.  We welcome essays from all disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. Transformations publishes only essays that focus on pedagogical praxis and/or pedagogical theory.

Possible topics for pedagogy-related articles:

Teaching digital media as a subject                                    Distance Learning
Digital texts                                                                        Mapping software/ Social geography
Creation of new knowledge                                               Collaboration
Virtual worlds                                                                    Digital storytelling
Unintended consequences of using digital media              Authorial/ Ownership issues
Creative commons                                                             Ethics and digital media
Access issues                                                                      Social media/social networking
Technologies of plagiarism                                               Libraries in the digital age
Email and the historical record                                          Politics of knowledge
Globalization and digital media                                        Faculty development
Portability of learning materials                                        Censorship/ Self censorship
Class/race/gender and digital media                                  Digital media and the arts
Personal vulnerability in the digital world                         Creating digital media
Immediacy/Ubiquity of information                                  Discipline shifts

Deadline: November 30, 2010

The PCA/ACA Award for Best Electronic Reference Site

In recognition of the importance of new academic formats, the PCA/ACA has established an Award for excellence as an Electronic Reference Site that a committee agrees has met the necessary qualifications for contributing significantly to the study of Popular and American Culture. It is awarded annually to the Electronic Reference Site that best demonstrates the following: Quality of research/scholarship, use of hypertext/networking of electronic medium, use of supplementary/secondary materials, contribution to popular and American studies scholarship, breadth of archived material, ease of searching, and updatability.
http://pcaaca.org/awards/awards.php

ASECS11: Digital Humanities Caucus Roundtable

http://www.eighteenthcentury.org/2010/09/15/asecs-2011-digital-humanities-caucus-roundtable-2/

This roundtable will consider how digital tools and digital methodologies are shaping eighteenth-century studies. Participants might reflect on the following questions, applied to both students and faculty:

  • What sorts of new research and teaching models are emerging in the digital age?
  • What drawbacks should scholars and teachers be wary of as we are confronted with these new possibilities?
  • How are collaborative, interdisciplinary projects affected by the digital humanities?
  • What lessons might we learn for our use of twenty-first-century technologies from eighteenth-century observations about print technology’s influence upon learning, knowledge, and communication?
  • Conversely, in what ways does the media culture of the twenty-first century shape our understanding of the eighteenth?

Publishing Opportunity with SHARP

SHARP (the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing) has just begun a new review series on electronic scholarly resources.

If you (or one of your graduate students) would be interested in doing a 750-word review of an online scholarly resource (such as The Whitman Archive or The Cather Archive) or a subscription database (such as “African-American Newspapers: The 19th Century”), please contact Katherine Harris at katherine.harris@sjsu.edu. Any questions can be directed towards Prof. Harris as well.

Society for Textual Scholarship 2011

A few months ago, Matt Gold posted a CFP to this list regarding the 2011 meeting of the Society for Textual Scholarship (which will be at Penn State on March 16-18; see http://mith.umd.edu/sts/html/callforpapers.php). Matt and I (mostly Matt) bounced around some ideas for a potential panel that the Digital Americanists could sponsor. These topics are:

— Digital Texts and the Spatial Turn
— Digital Textuality and Locative Media
— Social Media and the Digital Scholarly Edition

Is anyone interested in being a part of a panel for STS next year? Let me know at whitley@lehigh.edu if you’re interested and we can pull together an official Digital Americanists panel. I should note that the deadline for proposals is Oct. 31, so I’d need to hear from you by at least the end of September if you’re interested.

Sobering thoughts on the decline of blogging

A recent Newsweek article (http://www.newsweek.com/2010/08/09/take-this-blog-and-shove-it.html) about the decline of blogging has left me feeling melancholic about the sense of infinite possibility that has surrounded the World Wide Web since the mid-90s. Newsweek reports that fewer and fewer people are writing their own blogs, fewer and fewer people are contributing to Wikipedia, and that, increasingly, people are using the Internet to shop, tweet, and check their Facebook accounts. In the Literature and the World Wide Web class that I teach every summer, I expose my students to some of the earliest writers of digital fiction and poetry, and the ethos of these writers is, more or less, that you can do anything online: forms and genres no longer constrain, publishers and editors no longer guard the gates, and information and knowledge want to be free. Almost twenty years into the Internet, though, it seems like that sense of possibility is diminishing. Our experience with the ‘Net is increasingly limited to a number of highly formalized platforms (Google, Facebook, etc.), and the radical future we once imagined is failing to materialize. Maybe I’m being too pessimistic. Maybe I’ve just let the scare tactics of Newsweek get to me. I will admit to being nostalgic for the mid-90s and the sense of possibility that the Internet represented.

Adrian Johns on digital readers and rare books

From a recent symposium at the Newberry, here’s Johns discussing the study of digitized rare books on his eBook reader. He draws some interesting parallels to the reading practices of early modern coffee houses. (The link to Johns’ piece is at 9:30 am on the schedule for the RLG Symposium: http://www.oclc.org/research/events/2010-06-11.htm)